The New School for Social Research

Job Candidates

  • The Department of Politics works with advanced doctoral students to provide preparation for the job market. Each year, the department refreshes its list of students on the job market, and includes profiles of several additional advanced doctoral candidates whose work is representative of the diverse scholarship produced at The New School for Social Research. For questions, please contact Professor David Plotke. Please also visit our Recent Placements and Recent Dissertation Titles pages for more information about our students and alumni.

  • Geeti Das

    Expected Completion
    Spring 2018

    Curriculum vitae (PDF)

    Academia.edu Profile
    (PDF)

    Dissertation Title

    How We Got Better: American Psychiatric Classification and the Bureaucratization of Sexuality 1970 - Present

    Dissertation Committee
    Victoria Hattam, Lisa Rubin, Rafi Youatt

    Profile

    I work on gender and sexuality both in the United States and in the context of globalization. My research and teaching focus on how the dynamics of institutional change are affected by contestations over knowledge production and standardization. Most recently, my article, "Mostly Normal: American Psychiatric Taxonomy, Sexuality, and Neoliberal Mechanisms of Exclusion," appeared in Sexuality Research and Social Policy. I also presented at the 2017 European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) Joint Sessions in Nottingham.

    In the 2017-18 academic year, I am teaching a course called "Global Gender and Sexuality," designed for advanced undergraduate students. In 2017, I taught "Gender Beyond the West," which I proposed to The New School's Global Studies Program as a means of broadening discussions of gender and sexuality beyond Western epistemologies. In the same year, I was honored to receive the Outstanding Graduate Student Teaching Award, based in part on student nominations.

    As the coordinator of the Global Studies Program, I have had the opportunity to collaborate with the Chair on curriculum development, strategic planning, and program assessment. Past and ongoing work includes editorial and research support for non-governmental organizations based in New Delhi. This includes contributions to campaigns for the right to food and against prison torture. Across my research, teaching, and work in NGO's, I am committed to finding ways for institutions to build enduring mechanisms that support and maximize people's autonomy under conditions of duress.

    If you are interested in having a conversation about my work, or have questions, please feel free to get in touch.

    Contact Information

    Jan Piotr Dutkiewicz

    Expected Completion
    Spring 2018

    Curriculum vitae (PDF)

    Major Field
    Comparative Politics

    Dissertation Committee
    Jessica Pisano (Politics), Julia Ott (History), Rafi Youatt (Politics), Alex Blanchette (Tufts, Anthropology), Lori Gruen (Wesleyan, Philosophy)

    Profile

    I am a political economist whose research is concerned with the relationship between markets, violence, and social change, especially as these relate to the production, circulation, and consumption of everyday commodities. My dissertation, Capitalist Pigs: The Making of the Corporate Meat Animal, explores how agribusiness seeks to profit from an idealized industrial pig – as biological animal, financial security, and subject of ethical concern - and follows these various iterations from conception through consumption. In doing so, it analyzes the relationship between capital and life, arguing that the two are linked by what I term a “politics of commodification”: namely, the highly contested attempt to create a life form that suits the demands of the market. This work shows the complex, interconnected, and contested politics of quotidian economic activity in a contemporary context where markets increasingly create the subjects, spaces, and idioms of political action and debate.

    I have published on work stemming from this project in PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture as well as in The Guardian and Jacobin and, in Spanish, in horizontal. I have also published related work on environmental political economy in Society & Animals and in the recent NYU Press e-book Planet Ocean, and about corporate management in the Journal of Organizational Change Management. I have presented on my research in an interdisciplinary range of venues, including as an invited speaker at the University of Chicago and the University of Auckland. My research has been supported by a Doctoral Award from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and by fellowships from The New School, Wesleyan University, The Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies, and the Center for the Humanities and Social Change at the University of California – Santa Barbara.

    My work connects multiple academic disciplines, including political economy, critical theory, history, American studies, and anthropological approaches to the study of value and values. It is also informed by my professional background in print journalism and is rooted in ethnographic methods and a sensibility to situated social practice. Stemming from these interests, I also maintain a research agenda on sports cultures, focusing on the development of socio-cultural practices (about which I have published in Space and Culture) and the performance and policing of gender and affect (about which I have published in a recent edited volume).

    I bring these diverse research interests and methodological inclinations to my teaching, which seeks to lead students to think critically about, and expand the borders of, their own political and ethical commitments in the face of the social challenges their generation is facing. As a Teaching Fellow at The New School, I designed and taught the course Commodities: An Introduction to the Political Economy of Consumer Culture, which foregrounded empirical study of the circulation and valuation of basic commodities as a basis for analyzing contemporary political economic theory. As a visiting instructor, I have also taught courses on Transitions to Democracy (Clark University) and Introduction to International Trade (Carleton). In the Spring of 2018, I will be teaching the course Slaughterhouse: Reflections on Industrialized Violence, Labor, and Animality - which will examine the relationship between economic institutions and social values – at UCSB.

    More information about my research, publications, and presentations is available at www.jandutkiewicz.com. Please feel free to contact me

     

    Contact Information
    dutkj415@newschool.edu

    Lara-Zuzan Golesorkhi

    Expected Completion
    May 2018

    Curriculum vitae (PDF)

    Major Field
    American Politics

    Minor Field
    Comparative Politics

    Dissertation Title

    State-Islam relations in Germany and in the US - When Muslim Immigration and Secularization Meet

     

    Profile

    As a scholar, educator, and human rights advocate, I am concerned with issues pertaining to immigration and religion in Europe and in the US. My scholarly work and teaching experience span subfields, but my main focus lies in American Politics and Comparative Politics. I am the founder and executive director of a UN–awarded non-profit NGO (WoW e.V.) that addresses employment rights of Muslim immigrants and refugees in Germany. My policy practice has centered on ethnic, religious, and gender discrimination. While my scholarship and policy practice are closely connected in their thematic concerns, the former has generated distinctive theoretical insights while the latter has been focused on producing concrete recommendations in the area of migration.   

    My recent publication, "Unveiling Structural Challenges: The Headscarf and Employment Integration in Germany," appeared in the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs. Drawing from my dissertation research and policy practice, I examine the German employment sector as a space for integration, while making suggestions for an optimization of employment integration for women with Muslim migration background. I also recently presented a paper at the 2017 APSA Conference, "Employment Integration at Any Cost?: Germany’s 2016 Integration Act and Employment Measures for Refugees," which is currently under review.

    I have taught undergraduate courses at The New School -- including as a 2017 Teaching Fellow at the Eugene Lang College -- and at Queens College. Recent courses include Muslims and Islam in the U.S. (The New School), American Immigration Law (Queens College). I have also served as a teaching assistant in introductory undergraduate courses on American political institutions, as well as American domestic and foreign policy. 

    My next project will be a critique of citizenship as an inclusionary mechanism, examining the case of Muslim immigrants in both the United States and Europe. I always welcome questions about my scholarship, teaching, and policy practice. Please feel free to contact me.

     

    Contact Information
    golel902@newschool.edu

    Lucas Perelló

    Curriculum vitae (PDF)

    Profile

    I am an advanced doctoral student, working primarily in the subfields of Comparative Politics and American Politics. The focus of my dissertation is on voter-party linkages in developing democracies (specifically, Honduras), which examines the strategies that political parties use to appeal to voters—ranging from programmatic representation to clientelism. I plan to defend my dissertation proposal by Spring 2018.

    I have previously published book chapters on elections and political inequality in Chile. My latest co-authored article, The Malaise with Democratic Representation in Latin America, was published by Política y Gobierno (2017). My work-in-progress focuses on party system change in Chile and Honduras, as well as the determinants of support for presidents and constitutional reform in Chile. For a full list of recent and forthcoming publications, please see my curriculum vitae and/or visit my profiles on Academia or ResearchGate.

    I have a diverse teaching experience. I am currently an Adjunct Professor of International Studies and Political Science at Marymount Manhattan College and Yeshiva University, respectively. At Marymount Manhattan College I have taught or I am currently teaching courses on Comparative Politics, Populism and World Geography. At Yeshiva University I teach Fundamentals of Political Science and Peace & War. Beginning Spring 2018, I will be teaching courses on Latin American Politics, Global Political Economy, and Development & Democracy. In the past I have taught at The New School’s Eugene Lang College. 

    In addition to my research and teaching, I regularly publish columns on Latin American Politics at Global Americans. I am also a member at the American Political Science Association (APSA), the Midwestern Political Science Association (MPSA) and the Latin American Studies Association (LASA). 

    I am always happy to talk about Latin American Politics, development and democracy and elections. Please feel free to contact me at perel531@newschool.edu or follow me on Twitter at @lucasperello.

    Contact Information
    perel531@newschool.edu

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